Scripting – worth another look?

Scripting in contact centres has had a mixed reputation – most people love it or hate it, often based on perceptions of the inflexible scripting tools of the 80s and early 90s. 

Thankfully things have changed a lot since then, with new, dynamic scripting technology.  Whilst scripting won’t be the right solution for all call types, in our experience more and more housing associations are using it to achieve consistency in service delivery, to improve data capture and to achieve cost reductions through reduced handling times and savings made on training.  At a time when greater efficiency is needed without negatively impacting customer satisfaction, scripting is definitely worth another look.

Unlike the static scripting of days gone by, dynamic scripting is flexible, can be configured to multiple scenarios and respond to individual circumstances. Rather than restricting frontline staff, it actively empowers and enables them  to deliver better quality of service by providing them with the right information at the right time during every step of the process and accurately diagnosing the service response.

Here are just a few of the benefits of a dynamically scripted approach:

It enables consistent data capture – which in turn supports effective end to end delivery

It’s all about the data! Good data input is a requirement of good service.  If you enable quality data input at the front end of a process, the end to end fulfilment is more likely to be successful, in turn improving ‘right first time’ delivery and reducing avoidable contact.  Imagine for example that you are raising a repair.  Without a diagnostic tool you might have multiple options to choose from, and each with the potential for inaccuracy, particularly for new staff.  Dynamic scripting can improve accuracy every step of the way, from enabling diagnosis by using pictures rather than written descriptions,  interrogating other data sources for information relevant to the enquiry, property or customer, through to auto populating SOR codes and linking through to raise the repair appointment. 

It standardises the customer experience – but allows for personalisation

Today’s customers want things to be easy and service to be consistent, irrespective of the channel used.  Dynamic scripting tools can be integrated with existing systems to offer a unified customer experience online (online services are essentially scripting for customers), or in the contact centre, pulling relevant data through automatically, depending on who the caller is and what they want.  At the end of the contact, data is written back to systems in real time.

It saves time and money

By standardising processes and automating data input as far as possible, not only is the margin of error significantly reduced, it also speeds up the time taken for the whole customer interaction – be that online, or over the phone.  In contact centres, the introduction of dynamic scripting can lead to improved first contact resolution , resulting in a reduction in end to end enquiry handling times, and freeing up capacity that can be utilised in other ways, or to deliver cashable savings.

It reduces agent training time

Attrition is always an issue in service environments – and the cost of training new staff can be high, particularly for complex services.  Because dynamic scripting is designed to be intuitive and to drive up accuracy, less initial training is needed, in turn releasing capacity and saving time and money.

Effective scripting delivers all of these benefits and more.  Essentially scripts are just a way of making processes simple for customers and staff to understand.  Done well, they can improve accuracy, improve first time fix, reduce avoidable contact provide a personalised service and have a positive impact on costs – surely worth another look?

Peter

 

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